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Twenty-five Ways You Can Become A Mentor Right Now

2013 October 7
tags: Development, Leadership, Mentoring, Mentorship, Protege, Self-Care, Valuing Others, Volunteering
by Andrew   

Mentoring can be a great way to refresh your own professional skills, develop new ones, or share knowledge or skills you’ve gained in other areas of your life with people who might otherwise be denied those experiences.  Everyone has something to share or teach based on their life that someone else can benefit from.

Many people, however, don’t know how to go about becoming involved in mentoring, or don’t believe they have skills, abilities, or knowledge that’s worth transferring.  In this post, I include twenty-five ways for you to engage quickly in mentoring as quickly as today.

The following list of twenty-five ways to immediately become a mentor is provided as a guide, or suggestions.  There are certainly plenty of other ways to mentor people, and I encourage you to explore the myriad ideas that come to you until you find one or two that really seem like a good fit for you.

Here are a few suggestions to get you started:

  1. Volunteer to teach a class or a skill at a community center.
  2. Help out at a Boys/Girls Club.
  3. Become a volunteer leader at a Boy Scout/Girl Scout Troop.
  4. Become a counselor for one or more of the achievement badges used in Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts.
  5. Volunteer to read or deliver books at a hospital or elder care facility.  Enlist the aid of local youth groups in the project.
  6. Offer to help lead or coach at your church’s young adult ministry.
  7. Become a coach or assistant coach of a youth sports team.
  8. Volunteer in a prison ministry or prison outreach program that teaches life skills or business skills.
  9. Join or start a community garden.
  10. Be a great neighbor, coworker, or family member.  Mentor by example.
  11. Become a member of the Chamber of Commerce or Junior Chamber of Commerce in your area.
  12. Join a mentoring program in your community, or start one.
  13. Join a mentoring program at work, or start one if your workplace doesn’t have one.
  14. “Sponsor” one or more mentorees for an extended commitment, e.g. from high school through college and into their career.
  15. Start a program of extended mentorship and enlist the support of colleagues.
  16. Identify clean-up or repair efforts that need undertaking in your community and volunteer to organize or lead the efforts.
  17. Make a list of the people you know who have skills, experiences, or approaches to life that others would benefit from knowing, and encourage them to share them.  Help identify avenues where such efforts can be done as part of life rather than imposing additional burdens.
  18. Identify something enriching you used to experience that’s missing from the world today, and set about reintroducing it in small measures.
  19. Look for a skill or set of skills you have that isn’t taught at your local community college, and approach them about ways you can contribute.
  20. Look for opportunities to help others and invite people to lend their assistance if they can spare the time.  Let them make the choice.
  21. Model better behavior than you have to.
  22. Go out of your way to express appreciation and thankfulness.
  23. Send handwritten thank-you notes.  The effort sets a positive example.
  24. Be nice to telemarketers.  Other people are watching you sometimes.
  25. Make your life about being the best person you can be, without judging where others may be in their lives.

 

Each of these items has its own benefits and rewards, and many are shared across the various examples.  My list isn’t exhaustive by far, but it should serve to provide one or two things to get you thinking about where you can contribute in new and self-enriching ways.  Helping others is one of the best ways to put your own challenges in perspective.

 

 

 

Take care, and enjoy life,

Andrew

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